The Apple Roadmap: What Steve Jobs Doesn't Want Microsoft to Figure Out

Updated: July 13, 2010

I for one was and still am a Windows PC user because it's all I've ever used for computing. I used to laugh at my sisters Mac because the mouse only had one button... how the heck am I supposed to "right-click" with one button! I vowed never to touch a Mac. That said, as much as I disliked Apple, I was willing to give this great new portable music player called the iPod a try. Given my satisfaction with the iPod, I had to give Apple's next great device a try when they reinvented the the phone. It was the best mobile device on the market. As I became accustomed to downloading music, video, apps, etc. onto my iPhone and iPod Touch, along came another game changer, the iPad. The iPad uses the same iPhone OS operating system and at the 2010 WDC conference Steve Jobs announced that they would be removing the "Phone" from the name and now the operating system would be known as iOS which would power the iPhone, the iPod Touch, the iPad and most likely any other mobile device introduced by Apple in the future. That got me to thinking, though Apple was swallowing up market share in the mobile computing category, they still trailed the the desktop and laptop market by a large share to Windows-based PCs.

That's when the light went on and I started to see the big picture... the collision between the Mac OS and iOS. Apple recently said they sold their 100-millionth mobile device (iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad) and we can safely assume that a very large percentage of these customers are Windows PC users since Microsoft still has over 90% of the desktop market. Recently, Apple has been very quiet as to their Mac OS as all the focus has been on the iPhone OS or iOS. My gut feeling tells me that we will see a major update to Mac OS X in the future that will be directly tied to iOS and the iTunes ecosystem. The future Mac OS will have a lot of the same functionality and usability as the iPhone and iPad but with desktop-class power and storage.

Featured Research
  • Eight Ways You Should Be Using Contact Center Reporting

    Every day, your contact center collects critical data that can be used to drive strategic improvements to your efforts in the future. But that data is meaningless if you don’t know how to access and analyze it. The key to do doing both is using reporting features. By understanding how to use reporting tools, you will gain much greater insight from the data you are collecting. more

  • Is Your Phone System Stealing Profits?

    Having the wrong phone system can dramatically cut into your profits. Despite this, many businesses just sign up for a plan or platform that seems ‘good enough’. If you haven’t carefully considered your options and the included features, there’s a very good chance that you are leaving money on the table in some way. more

  • Best Video Conferencing Features for Business

    Most businesses are currently underutilizing their video conferencing software because they aren’t aware of the different ways it can be used. Understanding the different features of video conferencing software can be critical to getting the most out of your investment. These features often vary from one option to the next as well, so it's important to do your homework before choosing a specific service. more

  • Phone System Technology Showdown

    VoIP and IP telephony are often misconstrued as being the same type of phone system, but the truth is they operate on different technology and deployment methods. This guide will explain the differences between VoIP and IP, go into the pros and cons of both VoIP and IP-PBX, and give insight into which type of phone system will benefit your business the most. more

  • 8 Ways the Cloud is Changing ERP for the Better

    What if there was a tool available that allowed for you to save up to a quarter of your operational costs? Studies have shown that Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solutions enable businesses to access accurate, real-time information about daily operations which allow for the reduction of operational costs of up to 23% and administrative costs of up to 22%. more