Building a Sales Culture - 10 Rules for Success

Updated: November 18, 2010

Often times not. Many of these same executives, when it comes time to assess their employees, become hypocritical. The reason to evaluate a group like this is to learn who it would be fair to ask to participate in more aggressive business development. It's nice to want more of a sales culture but it's a morale-killer to ask people unsuitable or disinterested in the task to participate. Another reason to evaluate is to determine what realistic expectations should be for their group. And of course training. What kind of help will the group need? What kind of weaknesses do they have and what kinds of issues will they have difficulty overcoming?

Some managers begin to get protective (threatened) at this point. Can you soften the language? Those questions don't apply. Do they want to create more of a sales culture or not? Post evaluation they'll learn that some employees are totally wrong for participating in business development and they'll ask to make exceptions. They'll ask for training and then ruin it by saying that a particular approach won't work in their business (as if they would know!).

Here are the rules for developing more of a sales culture:

  1. The culture won't change on its own.
  2. The culture won't change without someone in management driving that change.
  3. The culture won't change without identifying the people who should participate.
  4. The culture won't change without simple, basic expectations.
  5. The culture won't change without showing them how to do what they need to do to meet the expectations.
  6. The culture won't change without training them with the necessary skills to provide them some ability and confidence.
  7. The culture won't change without coaching.
  8. The culture won't change without getting outside expert advice.
  9. The culture won't change unless there is an early emphasis on low-risk concepts like cross-selling, up-selling, calling inactive customers/clients, and trolling for referrals.
  10. The culture won't change unless management holds everyone accountable.
Featured Research
  • 15 Tools for Managing Remote Call Center Agents

    Together, technology and the connective power of the internet are making drastic changes in what a typical work setting looks like today, and many companies are beginning to rely more upon a remote workforce. In fact, according to Global Workplace Analytics, “regular work-at-home, among the non-self-employed population, has grown by 105% since 2005.” more

  • The Business Case for Updating an Aging Phone System

    You may think your business phone system is functional, but is it fully modern? In recent years, telecommunications technology has made major strides. A system that was perfectly serviceable ten years ago—or even five years ago—is now very out-of-date. more

  • 2017 ERP Buyer's Guide

    Among all of the business software applications necessary for business operations, ERP is undoubtedly one of the most important. Making the wrong selection can have a disastrous impact on your accounting, manufacturing, and supply chain. With so much at stake, it is crucial to make a well-informed decision. more

  • 2017 Contact Center Software Trends

    Did you know that, according to Forbes, 86 percent of customers will pay more for a better customer experience? Customer satisfaction is always a worthy business pursuit, but to identify customer preferences and exceed expectations, you must keep pace with innovations in the technology your customers are using. more

  • The Social Intranet: A guide to getting better business results

    This whitepaper describes why the shift from a traditional to a social intranet is imperative to staying competitive, and analyzes the costs and benefits associated with implementing one. You will also find useful KPIs to measure performance and further leverage your intranet's success, raising employee engagement and boosting your competitive advantage. more