I Hope You Don't Open Your Calls This Way

Updated: November 24, 2010

The answer is that you have to establish a real connection with your prospect and stop sounding like all the other sales reps who call them. Here is what your competition usually sounds like (I hope you're not doing this!):

"Oh hi Mr. __________, this is _______ _______ with the MLT Group. __________, we are an industry supply manufacturer and we help companies streamline their production process. We work with many companies in your field and save them between 10 to 15% on the cost of their storage and delivery process. What I'd like to do is ask you some questions to see how our process may save you that kind of money as well. Where are you currently getting your..."

Do you see how this opening makes no connection with the prospect? Do you see how it just starts pitching at the prospect and doesn't acknowledge that the prospect might be busy, or not interested? Do you see how there is no rapport built here and how it's a one sided conversation?

How do you feel when someone barges in on your day and starts in with a pitch like this? You're probably thinking what most prospects are thinking: "How do I get this sales rep off the phone?!"

Now let's look at the right way to open your call. Your goal in the first few seconds is to make a connection and get them to interact. You have to acknowledge that they may be busy or that you respect their time and you need to establish some rapport and separate yourself from all the other sales reps calling them.

Try this:

"Hi ________ this is _______ _______ with (your company), how's your Tuesday going? Great. Listen, _______, I know you probably get a ton of calls so I'll make this brief.

Let me ask you, if I could show you a better way of tracking and shipping (or) and save you money doing it, would it be worth spending five minutes with me next week to show you how?"

Or,

"What is the one thing you could change that would have a dramatic impact on your productivity and that would save your company money?"

Or,

"If you had a magic wand and could change one thing about how you currently do (their business), what would it be?"

Can you see how this quick questioning approach is more effective than what you may currently be using now? Eighty percent of your competition still barge in on their prospects and open their calls up with a long explanation about what they do and what they offer, and pitch their products and services without checking in with their prospects or establishing any kind of connection. No wonder most people brush them off the phone!

Featured Research
  • Is Your ERP Solution Out of Date?

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is a modern, large-scale software program designed to help businesses improve the internal flow of important corporate processes and communication. more

  • How Video Conferencing is Transforming Healthcare

    The telemedicine revolution is finally happening. Experts have been discussing the potential for patients and healthcare providers to connect remotely for years, but the market is just now moving to adopt it—in a big way. Data suggests this market will grow over 14% annually through 2020! more

  • How to Update Your Contact Center Software

    If improving customer experience is important to you (it should be), then 2017 may be a good year to reevaluate the software you use for your contact center. With customer preferences shifting, the importance of an efficient contact center has never been higher. You cannot afford to simply focus on keeping costs low. Significant competitive advantages are available to businesses who manage this area effectively. more

  • Leading the IT Revolution

    The status of technology within an organization is rapidly evolving—and so is the role of the CIO. With breakthrough capabilities enabled by new technologies, a growing shortage of available developers, and an increasingly tech-savvy business user, the role of IT—and the CIO in particular—is morphing into one of strategic advisor to the business and driver of innovation within the company. more

  • Leading the IT Revolution

    The status of technology within an organization is rapidly evolving—and so is the role of the CIO. With breakthrough capabilities enabled by new technologies, a growing shortage of available developers, and an increasingly tech-savvy business user, the role of IT—and the CIO in particular—is morphing into one of strategic advisor to the business and driver of innovation within the company. more