How to Save Time and Money in Your Hiring Process

Updated: June 10, 2010

BizTip #1 - Use selection hurdles that are appropriate for the job in question.

You're wasting your time and money if you use hurdles that are unsuitable for a particular job. For example, if you want to hire someone for an entry-level clerical job, it would not be cost-effective to put applicants through several rounds of testing and interviewing to weed out people who don't meet your requirements. However, if you want to hire a manager, using assessment simulations and panel interviews are probably worth the effort.

BizTip #2 - Always start with minimum qualification requirements.


Use less costly and time-consuming hurdles earlier in the hiring process. Make sure you tell people about minimum qualifications before the application process begins. It makes no sense wasting time evaluating individuals who don't meet basic job requirements (e.g., driver's license, college degree, relevant work experience, willingness to work different shifts).

BizTip #3 - Measure applicants' skills and abilities before you conduct job interviews.

Skills tests are relatively inexpensive compared to what it costs to interview applicants. Interviews are costly because they eat up interviewers' time. So test people before you interview them. There's no reason to interview individuals who don't have what it takes to be successful. Don't make the big mistake of failing to screen applicants before you interview them.

BizTip #4 - Assess job-related personality traits only if skills test standards are met.

Personality tests usually are more costly than skills tests. To save money, administer personality tests only to those individuals who have met the standards on the skill and ability tests. Make sure, however, that you use personality tests that measure the right traits needed for success on your jobs.

BizTip #5 - Use screening interviews before conducting in-depth interviews.

Prioritize competencies needed for your jobs. Then focus on these areas during shorter, preliminary interviews to eliminate people who are least likely to succeed on the job. Screening interviews can be an effective way to identify applicants who deserve more attention during a more costly and time consuming in-depth interview. Avoid using "casual interviews" and conduct structured job interviews to meet your specific business needs.

Featured Research
  • 2017 Contact Center Software Trends

    Did you know that, according to Forbes, 86 percent of customers will pay more for a better customer experience? Customer satisfaction is always a worthy business pursuit, but to identify customer preferences and exceed expectations, you must keep pace with innovations in the technology your customers are using. more

  • The Social Intranet: A guide to getting better business results

    This whitepaper describes why the shift from a traditional to a social intranet is imperative to staying competitive, and analyzes the costs and benefits associated with implementing one. You will also find useful KPIs to measure performance and further leverage your intranet's success, raising employee engagement and boosting your competitive advantage. more

  • How to Select Contact Center Software in 9 Steps

    Your choice of contact center software will affect the future success of your business. Don’t leave this important decision to chance. This guide provides nine actionable steps for the selection process. more

  • [Infographic] 15 Questions to Ask When Selecting a VoIP Provider

    Deciding which phone system is right for your business can be difficult. With our VoIP technology blueprint, discover the top 15 questions you should ask VoIP vendors before you make a buying decision. more

  • 2017 Business VoIP Buyer's Guide

    In 2017, more business will transition to a VoIP phone system. If you are among them—or if you’ll be upgrading an existing VoIP system—you need to learn about the latest technologies and market trends. more