UCStrategies Spotlight – September 3, 2010

Updated: September 03, 2010

Google's Android - Trouble in Paradise

By Michael Finneran

There has been much discussion of late regarding a possible downside to the Google Android operating system for mobile devices. The concerns are that the planned open applications environment will either fragment into a balkanized collection of insignificant entities or that the carriers will each develop their own unique implementations of Android and use them to promote for their own networks. In either case, the result would be that Android does not deliver the type of open mobile environment Google had promised with the Open Handset Alliance. Read the rest of this article on UCStrategies.com.

eZuce - UC Moves Deeper into the Cloud

By Jon Arnold

Last week saw the launch of yet another UC offering, and with that, the underlying value proposition continues to shift. This one caught my eye for a few reasons, and I'll touch on those here. Let's start with the name - my consulting focus is mostly about marketing and strategy, so this plays to what's closest to home for me.

The company is called eZuce - and if you're not sure how to pronounce it - or even spell it - you're not alone. Without even knowing what they do, the company has your attention already - nothing wrong with that. Read the rest of this article on UCStrategies.com.

Why Opportunity Discovery Methodology Works

By Don Van Doren

My partner, Marty Parker, provided an overview of the successful methodology our firm, UniComm Consulting, has been using to find opportunities for unified communications and to plan self-funding deployments. Here are some additional suggestions for planning your migration to UC-based communications. Read the rest of this article on UCStrategies.com.

Frustrated by the Channel? It's Mutual

By Dave Michels

A recurring theme I keep finding between manufacturers and their channel partners is mutual frustration. The dealers are being squeezed by a poor economy, Internet competition, and a changing business model, and they are looking to their vendor partners for air support. The vendors are not seeing the channel partners invest in the tools and skills needed for broader unified communication offerings. Both sides blame the other and are questioning their partnerships. Read the rest of this article on UCStrategies.com.

Gartner Magic Quadrant for Unified Communications 2010

By Marty Parker

The seventh annual Gartner Magic Quadrant for Unified Communications (UCMQ) was published on July 28, 2010, continuing this exciting story of disruptive evolution (almost a revolution) in the communications industry. Read the rest of this article on UCStrategies.com.

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