Ideal Situation for Hosted VoIP

By Kevin Stewart
Updated: February 10, 2011

Maintaining multiple office locations can be a huge expense for a business. Leasing office space, building it out to suit a particular business need, and installing computer and telephone systems can be very expensive. Not to mention the fact that soon after installation, computer and communications equipment becomes outdated and obsolete. Any small business that needs a powerful and flexible communications system should consider the hosted VoIP option.

For example, a small security system vendor that has a team of customer service and sales representatives would definitely benefit from the features of a hosted VoIP system. Where most of the operations of the business take place in the field, it makes better sense not to invest in brick and mortar office space. And there is no need to buy telecom and computer equipment when hosted VoIP can provide all of the needed technology.

Using auto attendant and call forwarding features, incoming calls can be directed to the right person, wherever they are. Calls can be transferred to mobile phones or customer phones, so that installers and salespeople can stay in touch with customers.

Multiple States or Regions

Businesses that operate in multiple states or regions can get even more benefit from hosted VoIP. Using special plans that offer toll-free and local numbers for direct dialing, the business can appear to be local to any desired area. Having sales and support teams able to operate in the field at customer sites, without having to "phone home" on a regular basis, is a big advantage for a small business.

Relocating

Whenever employees travel often or offices need to relocate to support clients in another region, hosted VoIP provides the technology and services to make regular business activity continue without interruption. Imagine the hassle of having to setup and break down physical offices and equipment more than a few times in a year. This activity alone could cost a business its entire budget. Using virtual offices and communications systems, any small business can operate anywhere and have its employees in any location.

The security system vendor in the example above might start out with a small region and a few sales and support representatives. After seeing some growth, expanding into other regions would be a simple process for hosted VoIP to handle. In fact, that expansion might only be possible through the use of hosted VoIP. 

With hosted VoIP service, businesses can reach new target markets, expand their customer support capabilities, and easily change their infrastructure to meet new challenges. Rather than just providing a new way of handling business communications, hosted VoIP gives businesses a new way of operating in a global economy.

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