Can MPLS handle business VoIP, business internet and website traffic?

By Kristine Hegglin
Updated: February 04, 2011

Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) can handle business Voice over IP (VoIP), business internet, and website traffic. MPLS was originally designed to increase router speed, but is now being used to improve IP networking capabilities. MPLS improves networking capabilities by enabling rapid data switching using labeled packets for network protocols. Each labeled packet contains routing information that rapidly identifies the destination of the packet, which increases the speed of network traffic. Today, most network service providers (NSP) use MPLS.

VoIP

MPLS can handle business VoIP, which uses the computer network as a telephone line. Even though VoIP uses about ten times more packets than regular data, the labeled voice packets are simply identified like all other labeled data packets improving the speed and quality of VoIP service. In fact, using MPLS with VoIP may help to eliminate dropped calls, make call quality better, and may be an overall more reliable method. To improve VoIP over MPLS some organizations opt for Session Initiated Protocol (SIP) trunking, which is a type of VoIP service. SIP trunking works with MPLS to enhance and improve voice quality. SIP trunking is not only available over an MPLS network. Businesses interested in SIP trunking can obtain this service through a SIP trunking service provider.

Business and Web Traffic

MPLS can handle business internet and website traffic in much the same way as it handles VoIP. Labeled packets are sent over the network, quickly identified, and sent to their final destination. With MPLS, network operators can reroute network traffic when link failures, bottlenecks, or internet congestions occur. And, if businesses streams media or high-bandwidth data, MPLS can help to eliminate packet loss. MPLS can be an economical solution for any size or type of business. Implementing MPLS is typically a quick and easy process as MPLS can be integrated with several existing infrastructures and platforms.

MPLS is appealing to many organizations because it is not dependent upon specific protocols, enables high-quality telecommunications, reduces costs, and offers a variety of services. Quality of service (QoS) for voice packets reduces latency and jitter during congestion. Another bonus with MPLS service is that organizations can leverage their existing equipment, which reduces spending. There are many MPLS vendors on the market that offer a variety of service level agreements (SLA).
 

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