Easy to Install Phone Systems

By Jelani Harper
Updated: July 11, 2011

There are several varieties of phone systems which may suit a particular enterprise. Some of the more common systems currently utilized include KSU-less systems, Key or key system units, Private Branch Exchange (PBX) systems, as well as Internet Protocol (IP) and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems. Although the cost and installation of a particular phone system can be expensive and require substantial technical expertise, there are quite a few phone systems which are relatively easy to install and which can be readily done without paying installation fees. Some of the more popular easily installed phone systems are detailed below.

Virtual PBX Systems

Virtual systems are quite possibly the most straightforward phone systems to set-up, largely due to the fact that the majority of the hardware and software used to operate them is stored and managed remotely. Set-up primarily consists of signing up for service (either by calling a particular company or by registering with it online) and adding the appropriate number of phones to be employed by an enterprise. VoIP phones can be plugged into an internet connection and used, since they’re configured to automatically set-up after connection. Additional phones can be added by creating an extension online and adding a phone number where calls are to be received.

KSU-less Phone Systems

These systems are ideal for 10 or less employees, and are highly portable since they are not directly wired into an office. They do not require a key service to route multiple calls like some systems do. All that’s needed to set them up is an AC plug, a four-wire phone cord and a headset cord, all of which typically come with the purchase of the system. Enterprises can simply plug the headset cord into headset’s port and into the opening for the cord on the phone’s side, plug the AC cord into an outlet and into the back of a particular phone, and connect the four-wire cord into the “Line 1” port on the phone’s back. Once the other end of the phone four-wire cord is plugged into the phone jack, service can begin.

Key Systems

To install a key system unit, first select a turnkey phone system and compatible VoIP telephones, figure out how many handsets and data ports are needed, and make sure there are enough data ports for phones and that there is sufficient network router capacity. Choose where you want to place the phone system, cable the data ports from the phones to the system, and plug in extension units with Cat 5 data patch cables. Lastly, configure the software and handsets by consulting documentation from whichever system was selected to assign and personalize extensions.
 

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