How to install a VoIP

By Catherine Hensley
Updated: September 07, 2011

Running a successful business in the global economy requires reliable and easy to use means of communication. VoIP technology is one such method that has become very popular with business owners. It’s adaptable, multifunctional, and generally low maintenance.

At its most basic, VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) needs only one single Internet connection in order to function. Across this one network, voice, email, fax, video, and other methods of communicating are transferred. A single VoIP system can manage all of those functions.

With the multifunctionality and benefits of a VoIP system, business owners can relax knowing that installing a VoIP system is also easy (http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Install-VoIP-Internet-Phone-Service-in-Your-Home&id=576456). Personally installing a VoIP system is a great way to save money while also learning more about the system itself and increasing your technical knowledge and skills in the process.

One of the first things you’ll notice is that VoIP phone service looks and feels just like traditional landline telephone service. To get started, you’ll need to select a VoIP service provider and sign up for a service contract with this company. Once you’ve done this, you should quickly receive a VoIP adapter (or “ATA”) in the mail. This is the “brains” powering your VoIP system.

After you’ve received the adapter, follow the instructions to attach it to your broadband modem/router, telephone, and computer. No special tools or software will be needed to do this. After you’ve installed the adapter, call the “activation phone number” that should have been sent when you signed up for service. (This number will likely be sent via email.) Upon activation, your VoIP Internet phone system will be ready to use!

To use multiple phones with your VoIP service, you’ll need a cordless, expandable phone system. You attach the base phone of this system to the VoIP adapter. The other cordless phones can be placed anywhere you want in your home office or place of business.

Many additional VoIP features, such as caller ID or voicemail, can be activated after installing and using your basic VoIP system. Simply contact your service provider or log-on to your account with them online, and ask for or select the services you’d like to add to your VoIP system. Similarly, features can be removed at any time as well.

VoIP technology is known for its adaptability, simplicity, and cost-savings benefits. Following these easy installation steps will ensure you keep your costs down while also quickly taking advantage of all that VoIP has to offer.
 

Featured Research
  • Phone Systems Comparison Guide: VoIP for Small to Midsize Businesses

    It was a painstaking process, but to help B2B companies start 2017 off on the right foot, we recently compiled a comparative list of the top 43 small to midsize business phone vendors. more

  • 16 Mistakes to Avoid When Buying a Phone System

    Purchasing a phone system for your business is a major investment. With the average business changing phone systems only once every seven years, it’s important to make the right decision. more

  • [Infographic] Top 11 VoIP Vendors

    A good VoIP provider will offer additional benefits as well, but many first-time buyers find assessing each option to be difficult. Nevertheless, this is an important step in the buying process because a substandard provider can easily waste both your time and money. more

  • The New 2017 Phone Systems Comparison Guide

    It was a painstaking process, but to help B2B companies start 2017 off on the right foot, we recently compiled a comparative list of the top 34 business phone vendors in the world. In one, easy-to-reference location, we’ve neatly outlined the information you need. more

  • 8 Common Pain Points UC Eliminates

    Many businesses rely on a collection of communication tools that they adopt to address specific needs as they arise. This strategy may seem to work in the beginning, but eventually will lead to a system that is cumbersome to use, difficult to explain to new hires, expensive, and effective in some areas, but full of gaps. more