What Features Are Available in New IP PBX Phone Systems?

By Jelani Harper
Updated: January 27, 2011

There are a number of features available in new Internet Protocol (IP) PBX (Private Branch Exchange) phone systems that will enhance both worker productivity and customer satisfaction. By cleverly combining internet access and computer adaptability with the latest in telecommunication capability for messaging and routing calls, users are assured of making and staying in contact with much needed employees, superiors, and an ever-increasingly global customer base.

Basic Features

Guided by any number of automatic attendants which receive the initial calls, a PBX system can direct calls, messages, and faxes to multiple destinations including cell phones, laptops, and landlines--simultaneously, if need be. The Find/Follow feature allows calls to be routed to varying locations until someone is reached, while auto attendants can place calls to virtual departments and dial-by-name directories. Call centers can be set up and designated to answer calls regarding specific topics, while the useful call queuing feature prioritizes the order of individual extensions that calls will be routed to.

The password protected voicemail features are just as versatile, including options for accessing voicemail through web interface, sending voicemails to e-mails, and sending messages to groups. Employees can even have multiple voicemail accounts, if needed, while a unified messaging feature allows voicemails, e-mails and faxes to go to one account. Other capabilities includes making and receiving of calls via computers, and there are a number of helpful remote office features that utilize alternate locations such as satellite offices, which function in support of primary branches. Conveniently, phones in the IP PBX system can be moved and plugged into different locations while still maintaining their initial features and phone number.

Virtual Numbers & e911

IP PBX phone systems also offer customers toll-free numbers to reach businesses. The systems allow for unlimited calling, which includes local access, virtual numbers, international virtual numbers, and directory assistance. In addition to analog phone features such as caller ID, call waiting and conference calls, an IP PBX offers call logs (which can be downloaded and printed out on PC’s,) as well as “do not disturb” features to ensure privacy. 911 calls made from a PBX automatically deliver the address of the locations the call was made from, while hosted PBX servers can direct calls to alternate sites in the event of disasters.

Featured Research
  • Is Your Phone System Stealing Profits?

    Having the wrong phone system can dramatically cut into your profits. Despite this, many businesses just sign up for a plan or platform that seems ‘good enough’. If you haven’t carefully considered your options and the included features, there’s a very good chance that you are leaving money on the table in some way. more

  • Phone System Technology Showdown

    VoIP and IP telephony are often misconstrued as being the same type of phone system, but the truth is they operate on different technology and deployment methods. This guide will explain the differences between VoIP and IP, go into the pros and cons of both VoIP and IP-PBX, and give insight into which type of phone system will benefit your business the most. more

  • Why Enterprises are Making the Switch to VoIP

    Your phone system is your most important business communication system. It allows you to connect with your employees, prospects, and clients. And wouldn't it be great if there was a solution that helped drive down costs while providing a competitive advantage? more

  • Business Phone System Buyer's Guide

    Communication has been a focal point in business since inception, but the industry is changing drastically in how people connect to one another and what tools and systems they use to do so. Less than 15 years ago, 90% of people relied on landline phone systems for communication. Today, less than 60% of Americans even have a landline and 40% rely solely on their mobile phone. more

  • The IT Manager's Survival Guide

    As an IT manager, maintaining physical fax servers and infrastructure is not a high priority. However, fax capability remains a business need simply because chances are your industry is dependent on its security. What if there was a way to reduce the amount of time spent handling fax complaints and maintaining physical servers? And this way took into account security, cost savings, and freed up your IT resources. Would you be interested? more