Voice4net Solutions Now Rated "Avaya Compliant"

Updated: May 22, 2012

Voice4net Solutions Now Rated "Avaya Compliant"

Voice4net, a leading provider of customer interaction and voice communications solutions for businesses, today announced that its ePBX Event Broadcast System (EBS) and Screen Pop Pro Server (SPPS) solutions, which include the Voice4net SFDC CTI Endpoint Connector 2.0, SPPS Client 6.1 and SPPS Server 6.0, are compliant with key small enterprise solutions from Avaya, a global provider of business collaboration systems, software and services.

The Voice4net EBS and SPPS telephony solutions help small businesses enhance the functionality of their call centers through advanced desktop communications features, including multi-dialing and auto-dialing capabilities; flexible configuration; robust PBX and carrier integration; and media broadcast options. The applications are now compliance-tested by Avaya for compatibility with: Avaya IP Office Release 8.0.

"We're excited to have our solutions successfully compliance-tested by DevConnect and to be welcomed into the Avaya DevConnect program," said Rick McFarland, chief executive officer, Voice4Net. "Compatibility with Avaya IP Office allows our customers to take advantage of Avaya's flexible, innovative and open-standard IP Office platform and provides an opportunity to expand the scope and efficiency of their contact center operation through the integration of Voice4net's versatile solutions. We look forward to delivering these advantages to both new and existing Avaya IP Office customers, offering more cost-effective and productive ways for them to leverage their IP Office systems to deliver highly-effective business services."

Voice4net is a Technology Partner in the Avaya DevConnect program—an initiative to develop, market and sell innovative third-party products that interoperate with Avaya technology and extend the value of a company’s investment in its network.

As a Technology Partner, Voice4net is eligible to submit products for compliance testing by the Avaya Solution Interoperability and Test Lab. There, a team of Avaya engineers develops a comprehensive test plan for each application to verify whether it is Avaya compatible. Doing so enables businesses to confidently add best-in-class capabilities to their network without having to replace their existing infrastructure—speeding deployment of new applications and reducing both network complexity and implementation costs.

"At Avaya, we're growing an ecosystem of Technology Partners who can contribute unique benefits to the telecommunications environments of our mutual customers," said Eric Rossman, vice president, developer relations, Avaya. "We're happy to have Voice4net's products join the fold of compliance-tested solutions that interoperate with Avaya IP Office."

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