Why VoIP is Different Than “Traditional” Phone Systems?

By Ryan Ayers
Updated: April 01, 2011

Traditionally, telephone calls are placed using physical equipment each step of the way. A pair of dedicated channels is needed to complete each call and must be maintained for the duration of the call. This type of call is impacted by factors such as distance, traffic, and availability, which can add to the cost of the call.

VoIP calls are placed via the Internet, rather than over telephone lines, sending the audio (your conversation) in digital “packets”. Using a process called “packet-switching”, voice data is transmitted and assembled at each end of the conversation with enough speed to ensure continuity throughout the call. By removing many of the limitations faced by “traditional” telephone calling, VoIP tends to be a much more cost-effective method of communication.

Because of its use of the Internet, rather than physical hardware, VoIP also allows businesses more agility when it comes to scaling their telephone systems, adding/removing features or restructuring their networks. This agility, coupled with a host of available features, gives businesses the power to operate in a more streamlined manner and to serve their customers much more effectively without the need for added personnel and equipment.

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